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  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon Generalexternal icon. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006 [accessed 2017 Jan 11].

You wouldn’t accept anything deadly being added to your food, so why accept the chemicals secondhand smoke brings your way?

Nickle

cast irons

Cumene

high octane motor fuel

Arsenic

rat poison

Benzene

gasoline

Cadmium

battery acid

Nicotine

insecticides 

Ammonia

household cleaners

Hexamine

lighter fluid

Chromium

stainless steel

Methanol

fuel

Beryllium

welding electrodes

Polonium-210

radioactive uranium ore

Nitrosamines

Pesticides

1,3-Butadiene

rubber tires

Acetaldehyde

disinfectants

Formaldehyde

embalming fluid

Vinyl Chloride

hazardous waste sites

Ethylene Oxide

antifreeze

Sources: 

--U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014. 

--U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. 

--National Toxicology Program. Tobacco-Related Exposures. In: Report on Carcinogens. Fourteenth Edition. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Toxicology Program.

Secondhand smoke contains thousands of chemicals, 69 of which can cause cancer. 1

Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke at work increase their lung cancer risk by 20–30%. 1

Secondhand smoke has killed 2.5 million non-smokers since 1964. 1